Pick an Ethical Employer

When you are looking for a job, how do you know if a prospective employer meets your ethical standards? This issue is addressed in the article http://tinyurl.com/qd8ggcm from the Huffington Post.

Ethics and Compliance Training

The bad news is that ethics and compliance training programs usually don’t work. The good new is that it really isn’t as hard as you may think to make it work. There is a recent article in a publication called Training on this topic. Follow the link below to read it.

http://www.trainingmag.com/ethics-training-doesn%E2%80%99t-often-work%E2%80%94-it-can

Reaching Agreement on Ethics

I am always troubled that as soon as people thing of ethics, their thoughts turn to intractable disagreement. But there are broad areas of agreement on ethics, even across cultures, and it is possible to build on these agreements. This is the topic of my new article at in Business Edge. You will find it at http://businessedge.michcpa.org/issue/article.aspx?i=v11n8&a=699&s=MI. As always comments are welcome.

 

Healthcare Reform

I am often asked what ethical questions are posed by healthcare reform. Like healthcare reform itself, this is an very complex issue about which confusion abounds. For example, healthcare reform extends healthcare coverage to more individuals. But it does so in part by cutting Medicare. Is this right? Are we financing our social goals on the backs of seniors? Healthcare reform also tries to push the costs of Medicare down through a program called the Medicare Shared Savings Program. I can’t explain the whole thing here but the basic idea is that Medicare rewards you if you drive down the costs for a given patient population while maintaining or improving quality. This sounds like a wonderfully noble idea Read the rest of this entry »

Be a Source of Ethical Influence

Some who have commented on Make An Ethical Difference: Tools for Better Action have pointed out that the tools provided for making an ethical difference are also good tools of influence. This makes sense since accomplishing something in ethics often means influencing people. Most discussion of influence are thinly veiled manuals on how to manipulate others. The problem with this is that people recognize that they have been manipulated and limit your future influence. When you influence with ethics, there is no rebound effect. In fact, your ability to influence grows as you learn to influence with ethics. A recent piece in CEO Magazine discusses just this point: http://chiefexecutive.net/4-ways-ceos-successfully-influence-decisions

How to Handle Whistleblowers

In my years as an ethics consultant, the one question that never goes away is, “What do we do about whistleblowers?” Companies always fear the trouble that whistleblowers may cause, but they seldom take the right precautionary steps. The whistleblower you need to worry about is the one who takes a concern outside of the company whether through litigation or the use of media or both. In order, not to have to worry about these external whistleblowers, you have to learn to love your internal whistleblowers – something few companies do. I write about this in some detail in a recent piece for the Globe and Mail‘s Leadership Lab. You can read it at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/careers/leadership-lab/why-embracing-whistleblowers-could-save-your-reputation/article17858924/ and give me comments at councile@aol.com.

Center for Creative Leadership

I have always loved the Center for Creative Leadership which was kind enough to interview me. They do good work! The interviewer was very nice and very bright and managed to cover my mistakes. You can read it at the link below.

Mark

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