Ethics for Start Ups

When you are starting a company, ethics may not be the first thing on your mind. The article referenced below talks about how to build ethics into a start up company.

http://www.alleywatch.com/blog/2015/05/08/5-keys-to-raising-ethical-standards-in-your-startup/

The Ethics Strategy: AMA

Those who have enjoyed the exchanges on ethics and strategy may want to look at the unified piece in the American Management Association’s “Playbook.” It is available at http://playbook.amanet.org/5-competitive-strategies-of-successful-and-ethical-companies/

Publications of Interest

I have found two recent publications that may be of interest. The first is on ethics and business success and pretty much follows the discussion here. It can be read at http://tinyurl.com/q55rash. The second is on a new topic which is how to build ethics into a start-up. This one is by Martin Zwilling and can be read at http://tinyurl.com/nb6jdug. Enjoy and comments are always welcome.

Hurdles for Compliance Officers

You may enjoy the attached article from the Report on Medicare Compliance on some of the practical issues that compliance officers face.

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Ethics and the Line of Command

You may enjoy this article by Harvey Schacter of the Globe & Mail on ethics and the line of command: http://tinyurl.com/o39df7v

Book at O’Reilly

My book Make an Ethical Difference is on sale at half price today at http://oreilly.com/. One day only.

Influence with Ethics

I recently had a chance to do a webinar for a company called Soundview. Soundview is famous for its its Executive Book Summaries.

The topic is how to influence people with ethics. The key theme is that most books and talks on influence teach you how to manipulate people. Manipulating people has a “rebound effect” when people realize that they have been manipulated. When you influence with ethics, there is no rebound effect. In fact, when you influence someone with ethics, you are building a foundation for your future efforts to influence them. So the webinar definitely talks about how to become an effective source of influence, but it emphasizes the advantages of taking an ethical approach to influence.

You can attend the webinar online at http://tinyurl.com/o7yy9fp.

Be a Source of Ethical Influence

Some who have commented on Make An Ethical Difference: Tools for Better Action have pointed out that the tools provided for making an ethical difference are also good tools of influence. This makes sense since accomplishing something in ethics often means influencing people. Most discussion of influence are thinly veiled manuals on how to manipulate others. The problem with this is that people recognize that they have been manipulated and limit your future influence. When you influence with ethics, there is no rebound effect. In fact, your ability to influence grows as you learn to influence with ethics. A recent piece in CEO Magazine discusses just this point: http://chiefexecutive.net/4-ways-ceos-successfully-influence-decisions

Talk About Ethics

When you write a book, your publisher wants you to get a lot of publicity which means, among other things, doing a lot of radio and television shows. This has nothing to do with your own credentials. PR people just arrange this. As you might imagine, with ethics as a topic, a lot of these interviews turn out to be humorous at best. But I was interviewed by Pat Raskin who runs a radio show and company called Positive Business, and she helped me cover the key points. You may want to listen.

Ethics Is Brain Food

Many of those who have read my book note that the advice given concerning ethical decision making is just plain good advice about making decisions. The truth is that what makes you a good ethical thinker does make you a better thinker – period. The reverse is not true. Being a good thinker does not make you more ethical. I did a full piece on this for the Toronto Globe and Mail in their career section. How can ethics make you a better thinker? Go to Globe and Mail.