Compliance Interview

In a recent interview, Mark Pastin discusses a wide range of issues on corporate compliance. Please feel free to offer comments on any of the topics discussed in the video.

 

Welcome

headshot of Mark PastinWelcome to Mark Pastin’s web site. You will find information about Mark and his publications, services and speaking engagements here. Mark started working on ethics and compliance problems in business, government and the professions in the early 1970s. His 1986 book, The Hard Problems of Management: Gaining the Ethics Edge, was the first to take a managerial approach to ethics in business. (See Publications for details.) In his new book, Mark shows readers how to use their own innate ethical sense to create organizational and social change. Make an Ethical Difference: Tools for Better Action was released late in 2013 and is available now at Amazon.com and Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Author Interview

The attached video explains the main themes of Mark Pastin’s new book Make an Ethical Difference. One novel theme of the book is that individuals have an innate ability to make ethical judgments. Pastin calls this ability the “ethics eye.” More on this topic in coming posts as the main themes of Make an Ethical Difference are previewed.

The Ethics Strategy #5

As part of a long-term research project, I identified five competitive strategies common to organizations that are successful and ethical on a sustained basis. None of these strategies considered alone guarantees ethical success. I have been sharing these strategies through a series of posts. Here is the final strategy in this series.

I once worked with a CEO who temporarily suspended all of his company’s significant operations in Mexico because he couldn’t find a way for his managers to uphold the company’s ethics while doing business there. This is an extreme example of an important practice, which is looking at business opportunities in terms of their ethical implications. While this is especially important internationally, there are also business opportunities domestically that are hard to pursue ethically. For example, it is particularly difficult to pursue an ethics strategy in a market in which competition is based entirely on price. The time to exercise ethical judgment is when you are considering an opportunity as opposed to when you are in the middle of regretting it.

The Ethics Strategy #4

As part of a long-term research project, I have identified five competitive strategies common to organizations that are successful and ethical on a sustained basis. None of these strategies considered alone guarantees ethical success. I will be sharing these through a series of posts. Here is the fourth strategy.

Define the value of your ethics.

If you are committed to ethics, you probably believe that the company’s ethical stance provides a benefit to its customers. It is not enough to just hope that your customers will notice this. It is up to you to define that benefit and make it apparent to your customers. For example, if you take the extra time to ensure that your products or services fit the customer’s needs, make this effort a part of what distinguishes you in the market place. Nordstrom has made a simple ethical commitment a cornerstone of its reputation. That commitment is to treat customers making a return the same as customers making a new purchase. The benefit to customers need not be something earth shaking; it just needs to be something customers will recognize.

The Ethics Strategy #3

As part of a long-term research project, I have identified five competitive strategies common to organizations that are successful and ethical on a sustained basis. None of these strategies considered alone guarantees ethical success. I will be sharing these strategies through a series of posts. Here is the third strategy.

Manage the moments of truth.

Jan Carlzon, former CEO of SAS airlines, used the phrase “moments of truth” to describe those times when the employees of a company have direct contact with its customers. Carlzon’s point was that if you treat customers fairly in each moment of truth, you will win the battle for customer loyalty. And you will only win these moments of truth if each and every employee knows how you expect them to handle such moments. The same can be said for ethics. If everyone in your company treats the company’s constituents ethically each time an employee has direct contact with them, the company will earn a lasting reputation for ethics. And this will only happen if each and every employee knows your ethical expectations for them.

The Ethics Strategy #2

As part of a long-term research project, I have identified five competitive strategies common to organizations that are successful and ethical on a sustained basis. None of these strategies considered alone guarantees ethical success. I will be sharing these strategies at markpastin.com and through a series of posts. Here is the second strategy.

Choose business partners carefully.

A wise adage says, “Lie down with dogs, wake up with fleas.” If you want to do business ethically, choose business partners that do business ethically. Even though your business partners are independent businesses, you assume responsibility for their actions when you choose to work with them. It did BP no good to point out that the accident that led to Gulf oil spill was due to a contractor; you cannot outsource responsibility. It is widely recognized that managing relationships with business partners is a key to competitive success today. An ethics strategy and a good business strategy converge with both requiring a careful look at business partners, although through somewhat different lenses.

The Ethics Strategy #1

As part of a long-term research project, I have identified five competitive strategies common to organizations that are successful and ethical on a sustained basis. None of these strategies considered alone guarantees ethical success. Here is the first strategy.

1. Provide a sound product or service.

While this seems obvious, the customer is often the forgotten player when it comes to ethics. Talking about customers seems dull compared to talking about global warming or genetically designed food. However, unless you provide good value to your customers, ethics is not part of your strategy. You may have a great environmental record, but if you stay in business by ripping off your customers, you are not doing business ethically. GM may be an otherwise ethical company, but when it sells cars with a known a safety problem, its ethics has spoken. In ethics, it all starts with a good value proposition for customers.

The Ethics Strategy

Being ethical does not guarantee business success. In 35 years as an ethics consultant, I have certainly seen companies disadvantaged by less ethical competitors. But I have also seen ethical companies succeed. Some succeed through sheer luck. But most succeed because they pursue a conscious strategy that incorporates their ethics. They make ethics part of the competitive advantage that enables them to succeed.

When I talk about pursuing a conscious strategy, I am not thinking of a formal strategic plan. I see few such plans in my consulting work and, when I do see one, it is not necessarily called upon when important decisions are made. But whether or not there is a formal plan, successful companies employ certain strategies to compete effectively. It is at the level of these competitive strategies that ethics can find a home.

I have identified five strategies common to companies that are successful and ethical on a sustained basis. None of these strategies considered in itself will guarantee ethical success. However, each of these strategies increases your chances of combined ethical and market success. I will be sharing these strategies in a series of posts over the next several weeks.

Avoid Fatal Ethics Mistakes #5

This is last post in the Avoid Fatal Ethics Mistakes series. I appreciate all of the positive comments especially on Linked In. Always feel free to comment here as well.

If you are not sure of an action, try explaining it to someone whose judgment you trust. This is not because you will benefit from what the other person has to say – although you probably will. But you will benefit primarily from your own attempt to explain the action. When you can not give an explanation you consider plausible, you are risking a fatal ethics mistake.

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